Start Your Family with Best Living Places

Start Your Family with Best Living Places

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Women’s volleyball: Michigan State’s Garvelink has superb chemistry with setter Minarick

Michigan State’s Alyssa Garvelink (left) and Rachel Minarick (right) have carried their chemistry onto the court.

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Four years ago, Alyssa Garvelink walked on to Michigan State’s campus a 6-foot-4, wide-eyed freshman.

The Holland, Michigan native was on a volleyball scholarship with six other freshman — and the future looked bright.

After three years, the Spartans are poised for a big season with a big senior class and have proved it with upset wins of the No. 1, No. 2 and No. 5 teams in the country this year.

Garvelink, an All-American middle blocker, and co-captain has led the way, along with fellow captain Rachel Minarick, the setter.

MORE: Missouri State’s Lily Johnson named AVCA Player of the Week

"Right away they got along exceptionally well," Michigan State coach Kathy George said. "They see it as getting great things done together."

The chemistry began off the court, but quickly carried over.

"We have always been friends off the court and that has been important in establishing trust, especially in a setter-hitter relationship. We were able to groom that really well last year. We had a good connection rhythmically," Minarick said. "It has been nice to work with her for so long."

If you’re like us, you were watching football last night! ICYMI- here’s highlights of our win over No 7 Wisconsin: pic.twitter.com/NTmQ73tz00

— MSU Volleyball (@MichStVB) October 8, 2017

Garvelink totaled 145 block assists and 160 total blocks as a junior. She averaged 1.40 blocks per set, which was second in the Big Ten. She totaled 273 kills and hit .359.

A lot of that success was aided by Minarick’s stellar play at setter. But even more than her play, Minarick quickly found a way to connect with Garvelink person-to-person.

"First and foremost, she is a very calming presence for me. We have a good understanding of each other. There is a lot of trust there. Honestly, we hit it off real quick," Garvelink said. "I am kind of a hothead on the court. She calms me down and keeps me level-headed."

With a level head, Garvelink transformed into an All-American, something Minarick got to see day in and day out standing next to her on the court.

MORE: Penn State claims No. 1 spot; Florida falls to fourth

"She matured a lot physically with her technical arm swing, approach patterns and tracking the ball. She really grew a lot, especially being able to move on after a mistake," Minarick said. "We are working a lot on tempos. We want to to be able to mix up our sets to the pins, because when you have a threat like Garvelink in the middle, that allows the pins to find the seams. We want to take advantage of that."

It wasn’t always that simple for the Spartans, who are ranked No. 10.

Week five of the Big Ten schedule is a Wednesday/Saturday affair – home against @umichvball for #JamJenison, on Saturday at @TerpsVolleyball pic.twitter.com/2l8swpOwET

— MSU Volleyball (@MichStVB) October 16, 2017

"Garvelink was really using the information that she had," George said. "She did a great job of processing the information, tracked everything a little better and put herself in position to hit. She found a better way to get herself into the offense. Those little things make a difference. Her adaptability grew and that made her so much more valuable.

"I see her being a better leader this year and seeing what kind of impact she can have on this team and our goals. She recognizes the responsibility she has for the team. It is demanding."

With seven seniors and a slew of stars returning, the Spartans have big goals.

"We are going to try to have a record year," Minarick said. "We have been in the second round of the NCAA tournament every year since this class can remember. We want to be Big Ten champs and maybe even make the Final Four."

This article is written by Dan D’Addona from Holland Sentinel, Mich. and was legally licensed via the Tribune Content Agency through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

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New Holland Brewing to offer first canned products

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Two brands, Mad Hatter India Ale and Hoptronix Double India Pale Ale, will be available on shelves nationwide in November 2017 and a third available nationwide in 2018.

New Holland Brewing has announced plans to make its beer brands available in cans.

In the past, the Holland-based craft brewery and distiller only made beers available in the bottle format. The plan is to start with two brands, Mad Hatter India Ale and Hoptronix Double India Pale Ale, which will be available on shelves nationwide in November 2017.

A third beer, Xtra Time American Session Beer, is going to only be available in Michigan until its nationwide release in 2018.

New Holland will continue to offer its beers in the bottle, but the plan is to shift the focus to canning for new releases.

“I am thrilled that we are adding cans to our lineup,” said Brett VanderKamp, president and founder of New Holland Brewing. “Having cans is going to ultimately benefit our consumer — our beer will be able to travel more places in a package that is desirable for people on the go. We are looking forward to growing and expanding our brands offered in cans as we move into 2018.”

Along with offering cans for the first time, this serves as the company’s first go at large format packaging. Mad Hatter and Xtra Time will be available on shelves in six and 12 pack options, while Hoptronix will be available only as a six pack.

The announcement comes just over six months after New Holland Brewing announced a new partnership with Pabst Brewing Company (PBC) that made all of New Holland’s craft beer for sale through PBC’s distribution and sales platform.

Despite that partnership, all New Holland beer will still be brewed and packaged at the brewery in Holland and the company will remain 100 percent independent in management of production, marketing and finance.

New Holland plans to continue the expansion of its can portfolio in 2018 and in November will announce additional new brands.

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The Old World Charm Of Holland, Michigan

The Old World Charm Of Holland, Michigan

Situated in both Ottawa and Allegan Counties, Holland, Michigan offers visitors a truly unique, old world experience. Thanks to the heavy influence of the town’s early Dutch settlers, Holland is renowned for its Tulip Time Festival, drawing tourists from far and wide. However, that is not all there is to this fascinating Midwestern destination.

Downtown Holland is recognized in the National Register of Historic Places. The district features an impressive system of underground pipes through which warm water travels in the winter months. This ensures that sidewalks and streets remain clear of snow and ice so that pedestrians can move about easily.

Holland’s proximity to the picturesque shores of Lake Michigan further enhances its appeal. With a number of public beaches including Tunnel Park and Holland State Park, outdoor enthusiasts will not be disappointed with time spent here.

While certainly not the only attraction in Holland, the annual Tulip Time is likely the most famous. Every May, tourists flock to the area to marvel at the nearly six million tulips that are planted in municipal parks, along city streets, at Windmill Island Gardens, Dutch Village and other key sites.

Nearly one million individuals come to Holland annually for what has been called America’s best small-town festival. Cruise vessels touring the Great Lakes often make a point of stopping in Holland so that their guests can catch a glimpse of the splendor these colorful blooms provide.

With the Holland Chorale, Holland Symphony Orchestra, the Holland Blast basketball team and the Hope College Flying Dutchmen football squad nearby, there is certainly no shortage of entertainment options. Holland really does have something for everyone and boasts a traditional European flair that is hard to top. Anyone planning a visit to Michigan should make a stop in Holland a priority.

Michigan helped make Donald Trump president. Is it ready to elect the nation’s first Muslim governor?

Democrat Abdul El-Sayed gives a high-five after a town hall event at Hope College in Holland, Mich. If elected, El-Sayed would become the nation’s first Muslim governor. (Laura McDermott / For The Times)

The Democratic candidate for Michigan governor stood before liberal activists, alone on stage, delivering a message of hope and inspiration.

His beloved state, he said, the state where he was born, where he summered on Crystal Lake, where he spoke for his graduating class at the University of Michigan and helped rebuild Detroit’s ravaged healthcare system, is suffering.

He may seem an unlikely savior, he said, at a mere age 32.

“A lot of my friends tell me … you’re relatively young,” he told the 50 or so filling the pews at a church in downtown Kalamazoo. “What they sometimes don’t say is you’re also relatively brown and relatively Muslim.”

Abdulrahman El-Sayed — plain old Abdul in campaign literature — is running to become the first Muslim governor in the nation’s history, in a state vital to President Trump’s election last November.

The sentiment that fueled Trump’s narrow victory, a combustible mix of economic anxiety and political grievance that brewed for decades, hasn’t gone away in just a few months; now El-Sayed is the one channeling that discontent. “Our state is literally crumbling beneath us,” he says of its decayed infrastructure. “People have been locked out of our economy.”

But instead of fanning resentment, or egging audiences to lash out, El-Sayed seeks to uplift, suggesting his only-in-America story — a tale of immigrant parents and striving and overcoming ethnic and cultural differences, even within his own family — shows Michigan a way forward, if people look past things like skin color and religion.

From inner-city Detroit to the farthest rural reaches of the state, he tells audiences, there is a hunger for opportunity and safety and economic security. “In polarized times,” he says, “the single most empathetic thing we can do is reach out.”

It is a highly idealistic and aspirational notion, in an era when the country’s politics have rarely seemed so mean or low.

But El-Sayed has already raised more than $1 million, an impressive sum for a political newcomer, and established himself as a serious — if underdog — contender in the crowded gubernatorial field. The incumbent, Republican Rick Snyder, is termed out after 2018.

Since announcing his candidacy on a blustery February day, El-Sayed has visited 87 cities and more than half of Michigan’s 83 counties, traveling in pursuit of a belief that to know him is not necessarily to love him but, at least, to set aside judgment and hear what he has to say.

Then, perhaps, vote for him.

“There is going to be a little of, we’ll just say, consternation,” he acknowledged, as nightfall sifted through stained glass at the First Congregational Church. “But I also know that most of the time people recognize that if you care about their issues, once they’ve seen you, that abstract notion of your faith goes away.”

El-Sayed’s politics are unabashedly liberal, taking after Bernie Sanders’ anti-corporate, shake-his-fist-at-the-establishment approach. He supports government-run universal healthcare, legalized marijuana, a $15 minimum wage and a “sanctuary state” designation to aid undocumented immigrants.

Those positions could prove problematic in November 2018 in a state where Republicans have won five of the last seven gubernatorial contests and run both houses of the Legislature. “We’re not a liberal state,” said Ed Sarpolus, a veteran Michigan pollster, noting even many Democrats are conservative when it comes to cultural issues such as guns and abortion.

But before he even looks to the general election, El-Sayed must win the August primary, where the front-runner is former Democratic Senate leader Gretchen Whitmer.

“He’s got an uphill battle,” said Joe DiSano, a party strategist who is neutral in the contest. “If he goes up to places like Ishpeming and Caledonia” — to cite two small rural communities — “many of those folks have never met a Muslim. That’s a big problem.”

Undeterred, El-Sayed has a strategy that rests on a healthy dose of charisma, his identity as a physician just entering politics and a resume that fairly leaps off the page.

The son of Egyptian immigrants who settled in the large Arab-American community outside Detroit, El-Sayed captained his high school football, wrestling and lacrosse teams. Graduating from the University of Michigan he wowed the commencement speaker, President Clinton, with his eloquent introductory remarks (though El-Sayed ignored his advice to skip medicine and pursue a political career).

He became a Rhodes scholar, earned a doctorate in public health at Oxford, co-wrote the textbook he used to teach epidemiology at Columbia University, then in 2015, at age 30, gave up a tenure-track professorship to become Detroit’s director of public health. As he campaigns, he touts his work there providing free eyeglasses to poor kids, expanding testing for lead exposure and forcing an oil refiner to slash emissions in one of Detroit’s most polluted neighborhoods.

The impetus to quit and run for governor, he said, was the debacle in Flint, where state cost-cutting led to poisoning of the city’s water supply and handed Democrats an issue to bludgeon Republicans in Lansing, the state capital.

Trump’s election, after a campaign freighted with anti-Islamic rhetoric, was added incentive, though El-Sayed insists he is not out to prove any point. “I am running because I think I could be the best governor for my state,” he said on Grand Rapids talk radio. “I am not running to be the first of anything.”

Given the climate, the effort entails no small amount of personal risk.

El-Sayed’s campaign headquarters is kept secret, for safety reasons. The SUV he rides in is purposely nondescript, bearing no hint of its passenger. After numerous death threats — including some aimed at his wife, a psychiatrist pregnant with their first child — he hired a bodyguard.

Still, his candidacy is rooted in a fundamental optimism arising, he suggests, from the experience of his “wholly uncommon if entirely American family.”

He begins most stops by narrating an account of their Thanksgiving dinners. Among those seated are El-Sayed’s father, Mohamed, who leads prayers at his mosque; his father’s second wife, Jackie, whose family has been in Michigan since before the Revolutionary War; his grandma, Judy, a deacon at her Presbyterian church in Flint; and an uncle, Piotr, a Polish immigrant and atheist.

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Holland Says Athanasiou Stalemate Not Tied To Wings’ Bad Contracts: “That’s Total BS”

Holland Says Athanasiou Stalemate Not Tied To Wings’ Bad Contracts: “That’s Total BS”

TORONTO, CANADA – MARCH 07: Andreas Athanasiou #72 of the Detroit Red Wings is chased by Brian Boyle #24 of the Toronto Maple Leafs during an NHL game at Air Canada Centre on March 7, 2017 in Toronto, Canada. (Photo by Vaughn Ridley/Getty Images)

@burchie_kid

Andreas Athanasiou remains unsigned as the 2017-18 season gets underway, but Red Wings GM Ken Holland insists it’s not related to the team’s salary-cap crunch.

“Absolutely not,” Holland told the Jamie and Stoney Show on 97.1 The Ticket.

He made this clear to Athanasiou and his agent Darren Ferris when they first met this summer.

“I told them in July, ‘Don’t worry about the salary cap. I’m in charge of the hockey team. We have to find a contract that’s fair for Andreas based upon the comparables.’ That was certainly one of my first points that I made to Darren Ferris,” Holland said.

Per multiple reports, the Red Wings have offered Athanasiou a two-year deal worth $1.9 million annually and a one-year deal worth $1.25 million. (The latter option would allow him to make more money next summer through arbitration.) Athanasiou, a restricted free agent, is asking for $2.5 million per season.

The Wings’ payroll is right up against the $75 million salary cap, due in large part to a number of bloated contracts for aging players, and Holland would have to shed some money to make room for Athanasiou. But he doesn’t feel handcuffed by the team’s cap crunch because a) he’s confident he can make the pieces fit, and b) he believes the offers on the table for Athanasiou are already fair.

“Where we are with regards to, ‘Oh, Holland’s got all his money tied up in bad contracts and he can’t do anything,’ that’s all total BS. I made that very clear to Darren from the get-go,” Holland said. “We’re going to negotiate a contract here that’s fair for the club and fair for Andreas based upon the comparables in the NHL — similar age, similar experience, similar accomplishments, similar ice time.

“When you go to an arbitration case they don’t say, ‘Are you big or small? Are you fast or slow?’ They look at stats. Everyone talks about analytics, analytics. Well, based upon analytics, to find a fair solution has certainly been my agenda going into it.”

Athanasiou is one of Detroit’s best offensive players. He’s got the speed to create opportunities for himself and the hands to finish in tight. The 23-year-old is undeniably gifted. Still, his numbers aren’t eye-popping: 18 goals and 27 points in 64 games last season, 27 goals and 43 points in 101 career games.

The Blue Jackets signed Josh Anderson, 23, to a three-year deal worth $1.85 million annually on Monday. Anderson tallied 17 goals and 29 points in 78 games last season.

The Maple Leafs signed Connor Brown, 23, to a three-year deal worth $2.1 million annually in August. Brown had 20 goals and 36 points in 82 games last season.

Said Holland, “When I negotiate contracts we don’t pick numbers out of the blue. They’re based upon what’s going on around the NHL.”

Defenders of Athanasiou would argue his stats have been repressed by a lack of opportunity. The fleet-footed forward has a knack for maximizing his ice time, and he finished toward the bottom of the team in this category last season. It’s fair to wonder if this is contributing to his decision to hold out and weigh offers from the KHL.

“They all think they don’t play enough. I think there’s 15 guys down there (in the locker room) that don’t think they play enough,” Holland said. “That’s pro sports. They all want to play more, but at the end of the day do we find ways to get solutions? Yes.”

In a meeting with Athanasiou and Ferris during training camp last month, Holland assured Athanasiou an expanded role in the 2017-18 season.

“I made a point of saying that we see him as a top-nine forward in ice time, he’s going to be on one of our power play units, he’s going to be on one our penalty-killing units. Certainly, the role that the coach sees him in, in my opinion, is a very important role,” said Holland.

Holland has communicated with Ferris this week, but negotiations seem to be at a standstill. It’s likely a matter of which side blinks first.

“We’ve talked a lot, obviously there’s nothing really going on right now,” Holland said. “Do I think anything’s going to happen soon? No.”

Athanasiou has reportedly received a number of appealing offers from KHL teams, where he stands to make more money than in the NHL. However, the KHL season is already well underway, and Athanasiou would be no closer to unrestricted free agency upon his return to the NHL.

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Apartments for Rent in Holland, MI

Apartments for Rent in Holland, MI

You searched for apartments in Holland, MI. Let Apartments.com help you find the perfect rental near you. Click to view any of these 143 available rental units in Holland to see photos, reviews, floor plans and verified information about schools, neighborhoods, unit availability and more. Apartments.com has the most extensive inventory of any apartment search site, with over 149 thousand currently available apartments for rent. You can trust Apartments.com to find your next Holland apartment. You searched for in Holland, MI. Let Apartments.com help you find the perfect rental near you. Click to view any of these 143 available rental units in Holland to see photos, reviews, floor plans and verified information about schools, neighborhoods, unit availability and more. Apartments.com has the most extensive inventory of any apartment search site, with over 149 thousand currently available apartments for rent. You can trust Apartments.com to find your next Holland rental.

A beautiful lakeside community that wears its heritage proudly.
Affordable Tourism Coastal Boating Lake

Holland is a small city on Michigan’s west coast, about thirty minutes from Grand Rapids. As you might guess, Holland has a strong Dutch heritage, which is on prominent display all around town: the Dutch Village and Windmill Island are local landmarks, and tulips are everywhere (in fact, one of the biggest events of the year is the Tulip Time Festival in May).

8th street serves as downtown Holland’s main drag, packed with world-class restaurants, specialty shops, breweries, and entertainment venues in a beautiful tree-lined setting. Lake Macatawa (which feeds into Lake Michigan) is a major attraction as well—boating, fishing, and just lounging on the beach are popular summer pastimes among locals. Rent for houses and apartments is quite affordable in many parts of town, with something to suit any taste and budget.

Rent Trends

As of September 2017, the average apartment rent in Holland, MI is $438 for a studio, $829 for one bedroom, $912 for two bedrooms, and $1,160 for three bedrooms. Apartment rent in Holland has increased by 2.8% in the past year.

A beautiful lakeside community that wears its heritage proudly.
Affordable Tourism Coastal Boating Lake

Holland is a small city on Michigan’s west coast, about thirty minutes from Grand Rapids. As you might guess, Holland has a strong Dutch heritage, which is on prominent display all around town: the Dutch Village and Windmill Island are local landmarks, and tulips are everywhere (in fact, one of the biggest events of the year is the Tulip Time Festival in May).

8th street serves as downtown Holland’s main drag, packed with world-class restaurants, specialty shops, breweries, and entertainment venues in a beautiful tree-lined setting. Lake Macatawa (which feeds into Lake Michigan) is a major attraction as well—boating, fishing, and just lounging on the beach are popular summer pastimes among locals. Rent for houses and apartments is quite affordable in many parts of town, with something to suit any taste and budget.

Rent Trends

As of September 2017, the average apartment rent in Holland, MI is $438 for a studio, $829 for one bedroom, $912 for two bedrooms, and $1,160 for three bedrooms. Apartment rent in Holland has increased by 2.8% in the past year.

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Ballyviktor – Holland, MI – Smithsonian Art Inventory Sculptures on Waymarking.com

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Ballyviktor – Holland, MI

Quick Description: This sculpture by Stuart Luckman, placed in 1983, is located on the Van Raalte Commons on the campus of Hope College and adjacent to the Western Theological Seminary campus. It is one of only three public sculptures the artist has done to date.

Long Description:
From Stewart Luckmans website :

"A commission resulting from a national competition seeking a public sculpture to commemorate the founding of a liberal arts college by immigrants from Holland. It symbolizes their overcoming hard winters in the new land, remaining undeterred in fulfilling that dream, and developing Hope College, in Holland, Michigan."

(visit link)

TITLE: BallyviktorARTIST(S): STUART O. LUCKMANDATE: 1983MEDIUM: Stainless SteelCONTROL NUMBER: IAS MI000515Direct Link to the Individual Listing in the Smithsonian Art Inventory: [Web Link]PHYSICAL LOCATION: Van Raalte Commons on the campus of Hope CollegeDIFFERENCES NOTED BETWEEN THE INVENTORY LISTING AND YOUR OBSERVATIONS AND RESEARCH: None observed.

Visit Instructions:
Please give the date of your visit, your impressions of the sculpture, and at least ONE ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPH. Add any additional information you may have, particularly any personal observations about the condition of the sculpture.

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Man pulled from Lake Michigan was recent Calvin College grad

Man pulled from Lake Michigan was recent Calvin College grad

HOLLAND, MICH. – The Ottawa County Sheriff’s Office is continuing to investigate the death of a 23-year-old man found face down in Lake Michigan on Sunday. Nathan Marcus died after he fell off a jet ski.

Friends of the Marcus family tell us, Nate was a recent Calvin College graduate who had a bright future ahead of him.

Authorities say they were dispatched to the water near Tunnel Park and found a man face down Sunday afternoon, Sept. 17. He was wearing a life jacket but not moving. He was pulled from the water and later died at Holland Hospital.

On Tuesday, the Holland community mourned the sudden loss. The young man was a pole vaulter at both Holland Christian and Calvin College.

Calvin College President Michael Le Roy sent WZZM 13 this statement saying part:

Nate is fondly remembered by the Calvin community who got to know him during his four years here. He was a classmate, a teammate and most importantly a friend to many. …Our prayers have and will continue to be with Nate’s family and friends."

Described as a passionate man, his obituary reads:

His love for life was surpassed only by his love for his extended family and close friends. Nate was caring and compassionate, the first to offer a helping hand or come alongside a loved one in need."

A memorial service for Nate will be this Friday, September 22, at Harderwyk Ministries in Holland at 11:00 a.m.

WZZM 13 did reach out to the Marcus family for comment, and they said they as much as they’d love to share how amazing Nate was, they needed a little more time.

►Make it easy to keep up to date with more stories like this. Download the WZZM 13 app now.

© 2017 WZZM-TV

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Made in Michigan: Holland Bowl Mill

HOLLAND (WJRT) – (09/13/17) – Many homes across the country have beautiful wooden bowls in their dining rooms and kitchens. Chances are they come from the Holland Bowl Mill in Michigan, the largest commercial wooden bowl maker in the United States.

Every week, the Holland Bowl Mill turns out 800 to 1,000 wooden bowls. They are used for everything from decorations to serving salad. They go through a lot of trees here. 95% of them come from Michigan.

“Being part of Michigan, being from Holland, we like to keep everything local, keep all that lumber coming from Michigan.” said Kori Gier of Holland Bowl Mill.

Visitors tour the mill and see pieces of wood turned into bowls of all sizes.

“We’re getting three or four bowls out of one chunk of wood, which is pretty good.” said Mark Armstrong who is a big lathe bowl maker.

The process is a little loud and creates lots of shavings. Don’t worry, those shaving will be used by local farmers for stable bedding. Not every piece of wood becomes a bowl. Even the best lathe operator can have an off day. Things go better if the logs have been soak in water for several hours.

“The more moisture you can have in a log the better day you’re going to have turning them.” said Armstrong.

After the bowl is shaped it goes into a sanding room where through several steps it’s smoothed out and given a flat bottom. A wide variety of wood can become a Holland bowl.

“Cherry by far is the most intricate grain pattern. it just seems to resonate with the customer the best.” said Gier

After they’ve been sanded smooth, the bowls are dipped in mineral oil and allowed to dry. Eventually they are stacked for shipping.

“Our bowls are carried on the west coast, the east coast. We have some larger retailers like Crate and Barrel. We see every type of person in our store. There’s a bowl for everyone. There’s a bowl from $10 to $500.” said Gier.

And they can be used in a variety of way.

“Salad tastes best out of a wooden bowl/ Having a wooden bowl can be used as a centerpiece on our table, as a decor. They’re very, very versatile.” said Gier

They take pride in personalizing the bowl on request.

“We offer free engraving on the bottom underside of the bowl.” said Gier

The Gier family has owned the Holland Bowl Mill since 1985 and they would never think of leaving the state.

“Michigan is an amazing place to have a small business.” said Gier

And they take pride in being an important part of the west Michigan economy.

“Everyone likes to support the small business. Keep the money here in Holland and here in Michigan.” said Gier

The next time you’re in Holland, get the free tour and pick up a Holland Bowl that’s Made in Michigan.

Visit their website by clicking the link in the related links section of this story.

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Michigan Municipal League conference to be held next week in Holland

Michigan Municipal League conference to be held next week in Holland

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For the first time since 1899, the Michigan Municipal League will hold its conference in Holland.

The conference will be held through various events and sessions from Sept. 13 to 15.

The organization rotates its annual event around the state. The league works to make Michigan communities better through programming, advocacy, legal and insurance services, executive search services and education for municipal officials.

Matt Bach, communications director for the league, said Holland was chosen because of its hotel capacity and “placemaking” philosophies.

″(Placemaking) means having communities that are vibrant in a number of ways — having a walkable community, an arts and culture base and, supporting entrepreneurship — Holland has a lot of that,” he said.

Holland Mayor Nancy DeBoer attended the event in 2015 in Traverse City, and suggested to organizers that they consider Holland. After a successful tour of Holland sites, the league said yes.

With the opening of the Courtyard Holland Downtown hotel on Eighth Street, there is enough space to host upwards of 500 city council members, mayors, city managers and other officials from around the state. The nearby CityFlats hotel also has a large event space on its top floor.

“It’s a great networking experience; you get to know other people from other places,” DeBoer said.

This year, attendees will have a number of workshops and networking opportunities. Particularly Bach mentioned a session that will discuss the impact of federal decisions on state and local governments. A speaker will discuss local communities under the Trump administration.

“With a change in presidency always comes new challenges,” he said.

There will also be a workshop on medical marijuana, as after a bill that went into effect this year, communities can decide whether to allow dispensaries.

For a full list of the conference events, visit mml.org.

— Follow this reporter on Twitter @SentinelSydney.

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